Wednesday, 4 January 2012

White Men On Black Men

White Men On Black Men Biography
Activist and journalist Ida B. Wells-Barnett was an early proponent of civil rights. Editor and partial owner of her own newspaper, she published articles on topics considered controversial at the time. One of her main causes was fighting the practice of lynching, which she regarded as a horrific form of racial prejudice that no decent human being could ignore or justify. For years, the vicious practice of lynching had been widely used — especially in the South after the Civil War — as a means of punishing alleged criminals, although two-thirds of the victims were African American. The word "lynching" dates back to the late 1700s, when a frontier judge named Charles Lynch became known for dispensing with jury trials in favor of speedy hangings. These came to be known as "lynchings," and they later evolved into acts of mob violence in which someone was put to death, usually by hanging. Wells-Barnett waged her war against it in the press as well as on the podium, earning a reputation for fearlessness and determination despite numerous efforts to intimidate her, including death threats.
Ida B. Wells was born into slavery. Her mother, Lizzie Bell, had been bought and sold by a number of owners, while her father, James Wells, had but one master who was also his father and whose last name he took as his own. He was raised as his master's companion and was later apprenticed to a carpenter so that he could learn a trade. It was at the carpenter's home that James met Lizzie, who worked there as a cook, and the two eventually married. Ida, the first of their seven children, arrived during the summer of 1862 in Holly Springs, Mississippi, six months before Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation.
As was true of many former slaves, the Wells retained their old jobs even after the South had been defeated in the Civil War. But their expectations for their children had undergone a major change. It was very important to both parents that their children receive an education. James, for example, served on the first board of trustees for Rust College, a school founded and run by Northern missionaries. His children received their schooling there. Meanwhile, Lizzie also attended classes and learned to read the Bible. Favoring Shakespeare as well as the Scriptures, Ida was well on her way to completing high school when her parents and youngest sibling died along with 301 other residents of Holly Springs in the 1878 yellow-fever epidemic.
White Men On Black Men 
White Men On Black Men 
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White Men On Black Men 
White Men On Black Men 
White Men On Black Men 
White Men On Black Men 
White Men On Black Men 
James Gang - White Man, Black Man
The ORIGINAL White Men SECRETLY Love Black Women Interracial Dating and Relationships! Shhh!

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