Friday, 30 December 2011

White Women Black Men

White Women Black Men Biography
Ida B. Wells-Barnett ranks among the most important founders of modern civil rights and feminist movements among African Americans in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century United States. Her importance is both intellectual and social; the ideas she expressed and organizations she helped organize have endured to this day. Her analysis of lynching in the 1890s, especially of mob murder of black men wrongly accused of raping white women, has held up to the scrutiny of generations of scholars and activists, as have the organizations she helped shape: the National Association of Colored Women (1896) and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (1909). Thanks to the work of filmmaker William Greaves, efforts of local commemorators in Chicago, New York, and Memphis, and in 1990, the U.S. postal service, Wells-Barnett remains fairly visible in the contemporary landscape of American heroes and high achievers. In her own day, however, she was frequently embattled. Within black communities she was both celebrated and criticized for her outspokenness; outside black communities, she was often in physical danger for speech and behavior that was considered threatening to white supremacy. Hers was a life of risk taking and rejection, of path breaking and reversals, a life she herself assessed as frustrated. What follows is a map to some of the innovations and backlash Wells-Barnett embraced during nearly a half century of activism, teaching, and writing in the interest of social justice.

Conditions in the post-civil war south deeply shaped Wells-Barnett's sense of self and possibilities in the world. Born in 1862 in Holly Springs, Mississippi to slave parents, she faced both new opportunities and new oppressions in coming of age after the end of slavery. Wells-Barnett's parents fostered in their children a powerful religious faith, a strong work ethic, and pride in education. Her father, James Wells, was a skilled carpenter and a member of the Masons who, after the war, served on the Board of Holly Springs's local American Missionary Association school, Rust College, which his daughter attended. Her mother, Elizabeth Warrenton Wells, worked as a cook and was a devout Methodist who made sure her children attended church, where she herself learned to read the Bible. Wells-Barnett's autobiography notes her father's pride in his intellectually precocious daughter, whom he had read the newspapers aloud to friends and visitors at home. The yellow fever epidemic of 1878 took the lives of both James and Elizabeth and the youngest of the six Wells siblings. At that point, a sixteen-year-old Ida determined to keep the family together by earning money as a schoolteacher. With the support of extended family and the resources left by her parents (including a house), Wells-Barnett headed a household in Holly Springs in a manner notable but not wholly unusual for rural and small town families in the late-nineteenth-century south, a context in which children were expected to contribute to family income and in which people married and set to housekeeping at relatively young age.
White Women Black Men
White Women Black Men
White Women Black Men
White Women Black Men
White Women Black Men
White Women Black Men
White Women Black Men
White Women Black Men
Black men white women
Chris Rock - Black Men Love Big white women HD

No comments:

Post a Comment